Debt Distortion: Why Dave Ramsey and Robert Kiyosaki are BOTH Right

Imagine a world where everything you perceive to be true about finance, family, fitness, food, etc… is not what millions of other humans perceive to be true. Not only that – people attempt to bring you down for your beliefs, or talk quietly amongst themselves about how stupid you are for doing the things you do. To be fair, you don’t think that highly of them either. You’re experiencing selective distortion – welcome to planet Earth. A Tale of Two Titans Let’s take a look at two highly successful, well-respected financial gurus and their respective stances on debt: Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad, Poor Dad, says that there is such a thing as good debt – or debt used to buy money-generating assets like rental properties and business equipment.   Dave Ramsey, radio personality and author of The Total Money Makeover, teaches followers to avoid debt altogether, often quoting Proverbs 22:7 – “The rich rule over the poor, and the borrower is slave to the lender.” Both agree that  debt carried on credit cards and cars is to be avoided, because these things only make us poorer. Kiyosaki is not against using credit cards persay, but teaches that balances should be paid in full every month. While some see Ramsey’s stance on not using credit at all as extreme, the fact that the Federal Reserve estimates that almost half of U.S. households are unable to pay their credit card bills in full each month, and that these households owe more than $800 billion in card debt …

Sizzling Tulips- Why You Shouldn’t Try To Time The Market

What follows is a cautionary tale that perfectly illustrates why – when it comes to investing – we should all avoid trying to time the market. In essence, avoid the sizzle. The year is 1634. The place – Holland. Tulips made their way to the Dutch from Turkey and, being a new flower, were pretty pricey. People were paying a pretty penny for the pretty flower, but the tulip’s hay-day was still yet to come. After the flowers contracted a unique virus that presented itself as a flame-looking pattern on their petals, the craze began. As the variations continued to expand and prices continued to rise, “tulip-speculators” emerged as a real class of investor. People lost their minds. They traded in their homes to buy these things, liquidated life savings, cashed out on large assets, and probably the family dog too. The tulip bubble was intense. Tulip mania was real. At the height of the craze, a tulip would go for an entire estate. At the bottom, really – just the actual price of a flower (go figure). Guess what happened? Yup – high-volume holders of tulips began to sell, which created a domino effect and the market for this fine flower came tumbling down. The following depression was devastating, even for those that profited from the original sale of their flowers. The bottom line? When everyone’s piling on, that’s a great signal to stay away. Sizzling is really only awesome when it’s associated with a steak at Applebees being put in …